My favorite part of Southern Exposure was meeting so many amazing people. I had a lot of fun making my film and traveling to some of the many beautiful areas of Alabama. I love what Southern Exposure represents and was honored to be a part of it!

—Mindy Keeley, 2014 Fellow

Having the chance to explore Alabama's natural landscapes, the mentorship and peer-critique process within a diverse group of filmmakers, and the networking opportunities the process brought with it gave me such a positive experience with a group of peers whose friendship and work I truly value.

—Rhonda Chan Soo, 2013 Fellow

Southern Exposure was an amazing experience – learning about the pressures on the environment, being embraced by Alabama's community of environmental advocates, soaking in beautiful natural treasures, spending a summer with a talented group of filmmakers – I couldn't recommend it more.

—Emily Fraser, 2013 Fellow

They made it really easy for us to fall in love with Alabama, especially as first timers. I think they also made it really easy for us to become concerned about this beautiful place because they opened our eyes to a very diverse range of pressing environmental needs here.

—Liza Slutskaya, 2016 Fellow and 2018 Program Coordinator

Category: Wildlife protection

Sharing the Secrets

After millions of years in the making, Alabama has over 4,000 caves that are explored and beloved by spelunkers from all over. With a diverse array of underground plants, animals and other organisms, conserving these massive underground formations and their delicate ecosystems is crucial. Follow some of the most enthusiastic and daring cavers into the breathtaking hidden treasures of northeast Alabama, an area that boasts one of the highest concentrations of caves in the U.S. and supports incredible cave biodiversity. Directed by Drew Perlmutter.

Invasive in Alabama

Since arriving in Alabama in the 1500’s through Spanish settlers, the presence of feral hogs has increased in the past 20 years, resulting in serious environmental damage to farms and wilderness areas. This film explores the problems caused by invasive species through the eyes of those trying to curb the growing feral hog population in northern Alabama. Directed by Mindy Keeley.

In Our Nature

Explore Alabama’s environment through the eyes of its young, future environmentalists at Camp McDowell, a non-profit educational organization with a mission to connect young people to their environment and promote commitment to lifelong learning. Directed by Johanna Obenda.

Forever Wild

The Forever Wild Land Trust Program created state-owned Nature Preserves and Recreation areas after Alabama voters approved a constitutional amendment establishing the program in 1992, making it the most successful conservation ballot measure in the history of the United States. Here is the inspiring story of Alabama’s Forever Wild Land Trust, which has been renewed for another 20 years thanks to overwhelming public support. Directed by Sebastian Lasaosa Rogers .

Dammed: The Story of Alabama's Rivers

Dams can permanently disturb the structure and function of once free-flowing water bodies, and the damming of the Coosa River has resulted in one of the largest extinction events in U.S. history with 40 species lost forever. How has the damming of Alabama's rivers altered our watersheds, water quality, and water quantity of our state? Directed by Katherine Gorringe.

The Jewel of Alabama: Conserving the Tensaw Delta

Take a journey through one of the most beautiful and ecologically important hotspots on the planet: Alabama's Mobile-Tensaw Delta. Encompassing cypress swamps, marshes, and bottomland forests, this 260,000-acre area provides habitat for over 300 types of birds and over 60 rare or endangered species. Directed by Hiram Rogers.

Lost in the Wake

Two years after the 2010 BP oil spill, a devastated community on Mobile Bay, AL, continues to suffer ecologically, physically, and financially—its formerly booming fishing economy now stagnant. Hear the voices of local fisherman, scientists, doctors, and environmentalists as they describe the short-term consequences of possibly the biggest environmental catastrophe in history, and worry about what the future holds for Mobile Bay.
Directed by Katie Jewett.

For the Fish

In a state with 77,000 miles of rivers and streams, fishing is a way of life for many Alabama residents and supports a vibrant seafood and tourism industry. But Alabama's waterways--and the people and wildlife who depend on them--are facing an unprecedented array of threats, from the BP oil spill to coal ash pollution to contaminated runoff from construction sites. Directed by Jessica Pic.